Jason C Woodson

I am an Anglo-austral-african-american, which is a hyphenated way of saying I was born in New York, raised in Australia and am now a citizen of the United Kingdom.

This Tumblr is formed of my guilty pleasures, dark secrets and shameful self-promotion.

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Is Jesus a retelling of the Horus Myth?
Written in 1280 B.C., the Book of the Dead describes a God, Horus. Horus is the son of the god Osiris, born to a virgin mother. He was baptized in a river by Anup the Baptizer who was later beheaded. Like Jesus, Horus was tempted while alone in the desert, healed the sick, the blind, cast out demons, and walked on water. He raised Asar from the dead. “Asar” translates to “Lazarus.” Oh, yeah, he also had twelve disciples. Yes, Horus was crucified first, and after three days, two women announced Horus, the savior of humanity, had been resurrected. - Bill Maher, Religulous 2008

Is Jesus a retelling of the Horus Myth?

Written in 1280 B.C., the Book of the Dead describes a God, Horus. Horus is the son of the god Osiris, born to a virgin mother. He was baptized in a river by Anup the Baptizer who was later beheaded. Like Jesus, Horus was tempted while alone in the desert, healed the sick, the blind, cast out demons, and walked on water. He raised Asar from the dead. “Asar” translates to “Lazarus.” Oh, yeah, he also had twelve disciples. Yes, Horus was crucified first, and after three days, two women announced Horus, the savior of humanity, had been resurrected. - Bill Maher, Religulous 2008

(Source: queen-goblin-approximately)

Tagged • grace jones
Reblogged from uchoa04
Is the story of Jesus simply a retelling of the Osiris Myth?
Christ myth theory proponent G. A. Wells still sees an analogy with the Resurrection of Jesus in the Pauline epistles and Osiris, in that Osiris dies and is mourned on the first day and that his resurrection is celebrated on the third day with the joyful cry “Osiris has been found”.[36] However, since changing his position on the historicity of Jesus, Wells now states that the personage mentioned in the Q source is not all mythical and is “not to be identified with the dying and rising Christ of the early epistles”.[37] David J. MacLeod states that the Osiris legend is very different from the resurrection of Jesus in that “Osiris did not rise; he ruled in the abode of the dead.”[38]
Biblical scholar Bruce M. Metzger does not see a direct analogy and notes that in one account of the Osirian cycle he dies on the 17th of the month of Athyr (approximating to a month between October 28 and November 26 in modern calendars), is revivified on the 19th and compares this to Christ rising on the “third day” but thinks “resurrection” is a questionable description.[39] A. J. M. Wedderburn states that resurrection in Ancient Egypt differs from the Judaeo-Christian tradition, as the Ancient Egyptians conceived of the afterlife as entry into the kingdom of Osiris.[40] Marvin Mayer notes that some scholars regard the idea of dying and rising deities in the mystery religions as being fanciful but suggests this may be motivated by apologetic concerns, attempting to keep Christ’s resurrection as a unique event.  - Wikipedia

Is the story of Jesus simply a retelling of the Osiris Myth?

Christ myth theory proponent G. A. Wells still sees an analogy with the Resurrection of Jesus in the Pauline epistles and Osiris, in that Osiris dies and is mourned on the first day and that his resurrection is celebrated on the third day with the joyful cry “Osiris has been found”.[36] However, since changing his position on the historicity of Jesus, Wells now states that the personage mentioned in the Q source is not all mythical and is “not to be identified with the dying and rising Christ of the early epistles”.[37] David J. MacLeod states that the Osiris legend is very different from the resurrection of Jesus in that “Osiris did not rise; he ruled in the abode of the dead.”[38]

Biblical scholar Bruce M. Metzger does not see a direct analogy and notes that in one account of the Osirian cycle he dies on the 17th of the month of Athyr (approximating to a month between October 28 and November 26 in modern calendars), is revivified on the 19th and compares this to Christ rising on the “third day” but thinks “resurrection” is a questionable description.[39] A. J. M. Wedderburn states that resurrection in Ancient Egypt differs from the Judaeo-Christian tradition, as the Ancient Egyptians conceived of the afterlife as entry into the kingdom of Osiris.[40] Marvin Mayer notes that some scholars regard the idea of dying and rising deities in the mystery religions as being fanciful but suggests this may be motivated by apologetic concerns, attempting to keep Christ’s resurrection as a unique event.  - Wikipedia

Is the story of Jesus simply a retelling of the Osiris Myth?
Christ myth theory proponent G. A. Wells still sees an analogy with the Resurrection of Jesus in the Pauline epistles and Osiris, in that Osiris dies and is mourned on the first day and that his resurrection is celebrated on the third day with the joyful cry “Osiris has been found”.[36] However, since changing his position on the historicity of Jesus, Wells now states that the personage mentioned in the Q source is not all mythical and is “not to be identified with the dying and rising Christ of the early epistles”.[37] David J. MacLeod states that the Osiris legend is very different from the resurrection of Jesus in that “Osiris did not rise; he ruled in the abode of the dead.”[38]
Biblical scholar Bruce M. Metzger does not see a direct analogy and notes that in one account of the Osirian cycle he dies on the 17th of the month of Athyr (approximating to a month between October 28 and November 26 in modern calendars), is revivified on the 19th and compares this to Christ rising on the “third day” but thinks “resurrection” is a questionable description.[39] A. J. M. Wedderburn states that resurrection in Ancient Egypt differs from the Judaeo-Christian tradition, as the Ancient Egyptians conceived of the afterlife as entry into the kingdom of Osiris.[40] Marvin Mayer notes that some scholars regard the idea of dying and rising deities in the mystery religions as being fanciful but suggests this may be motivated by apologetic concerns, attempting to keep Christ’s resurrection as a unique event. - Wikipedia

Is the story of Jesus simply a retelling of the Osiris Myth?

Christ myth theory proponent G. A. Wells still sees an analogy with the Resurrection of Jesus in the Pauline epistles and Osiris, in that Osiris dies and is mourned on the first day and that his resurrection is celebrated on the third day with the joyful cry “Osiris has been found”.[36] However, since changing his position on the historicity of Jesus, Wells now states that the personage mentioned in the Q source is not all mythical and is “not to be identified with the dying and rising Christ of the early epistles”.[37] David J. MacLeod states that the Osiris legend is very different from the resurrection of Jesus in that “Osiris did not rise; he ruled in the abode of the dead.”[38]

Biblical scholar Bruce M. Metzger does not see a direct analogy and notes that in one account of the Osirian cycle he dies on the 17th of the month of Athyr (approximating to a month between October 28 and November 26 in modern calendars), is revivified on the 19th and compares this to Christ rising on the “third day” but thinks “resurrection” is a questionable description.[39] A. J. M. Wedderburn states that resurrection in Ancient Egypt differs from the Judaeo-Christian tradition, as the Ancient Egyptians conceived of the afterlife as entry into the kingdom of Osiris.[40] Marvin Mayer notes that some scholars regard the idea of dying and rising deities in the mystery religions as being fanciful but suggests this may be motivated by apologetic concerns, attempting to keep Christ’s resurrection as a unique event. - Wikipedia

Is the story of Jesus simply a retelling of the Osiris Myth?
Christ myth theory proponent G. A. Wells still sees an analogy with the Resurrection of Jesus in the Pauline epistles and Osiris, in that Osiris dies and is mourned on the first day and that his resurrection is celebrated on the third day with the joyful cry “Osiris has been found”.[36] However, since changing his position on the historicity of Jesus, Wells now states that the personage mentioned in the Q source is not all mythical and is “not to be identified with the dying and rising Christ of the early epistles”.[37] David J. MacLeod states that the Osiris legend is very different from the resurrection of Jesus in that “Osiris did not rise; he ruled in the abode of the dead.”[38]
Biblical scholar Bruce M. Metzger does not see a direct analogy and notes that in one account of the Osirian cycle he dies on the 17th of the month of Athyr (approximating to a month between October 28 and November 26 in modern calendars), is revivified on the 19th and compares this to Christ rising on the “third day” but thinks “resurrection” is a questionable description.[39] A. J. M. Wedderburn states that resurrection in Ancient Egypt differs from the Judaeo-Christian tradition, as the Ancient Egyptians conceived of the afterlife as entry into the kingdom of Osiris.[40] Marvin Mayer notes that some scholars regard the idea of dying and rising deities in the mystery religions as being fanciful but suggests this may be motivated by apologetic concerns, attempting to keep Christ’s resurrection as a unique event. - Wikipedia

Is the story of Jesus simply a retelling of the Osiris Myth?

Christ myth theory proponent G. A. Wells still sees an analogy with the Resurrection of Jesus in the Pauline epistles and Osiris, in that Osiris dies and is mourned on the first day and that his resurrection is celebrated on the third day with the joyful cry “Osiris has been found”.[36] However, since changing his position on the historicity of Jesus, Wells now states that the personage mentioned in the Q source is not all mythical and is “not to be identified with the dying and rising Christ of the early epistles”.[37] David J. MacLeod states that the Osiris legend is very different from the resurrection of Jesus in that “Osiris did not rise; he ruled in the abode of the dead.”[38]

Biblical scholar Bruce M. Metzger does not see a direct analogy and notes that in one account of the Osirian cycle he dies on the 17th of the month of Athyr (approximating to a month between October 28 and November 26 in modern calendars), is revivified on the 19th and compares this to Christ rising on the “third day” but thinks “resurrection” is a questionable description.[39] A. J. M. Wedderburn states that resurrection in Ancient Egypt differs from the Judaeo-Christian tradition, as the Ancient Egyptians conceived of the afterlife as entry into the kingdom of Osiris.[40] Marvin Mayer notes that some scholars regard the idea of dying and rising deities in the mystery religions as being fanciful but suggests this may be motivated by apologetic concerns, attempting to keep Christ’s resurrection as a unique event. - Wikipedia

Is the story of Jesus simply a retelling of the Osiris Myth?
Christ myth theory proponent G. A. Wells still sees an analogy with the Resurrection of Jesus in the Pauline epistles and Osiris, in that Osiris dies and is mourned on the first day and that his resurrection is celebrated on the third day with the joyful cry “Osiris has been found”.[36] However, since changing his position on the historicity of Jesus, Wells now states that the personage mentioned in the Q source is not all mythical and is “not to be identified with the dying and rising Christ of the early epistles”.[37] David J. MacLeod states that the Osiris legend is very different from the resurrection of Jesus in that “Osiris did not rise; he ruled in the abode of the dead.”[38]
Biblical scholar Bruce M. Metzger does not see a direct analogy and notes that in one account of the Osirian cycle he dies on the 17th of the month of Athyr (approximating to a month between October 28 and November 26 in modern calendars), is revivified on the 19th and compares this to Christ rising on the “third day” but thinks “resurrection” is a questionable description.[39] A. J. M. Wedderburn states that resurrection in Ancient Egypt differs from the Judaeo-Christian tradition, as the Ancient Egyptians conceived of the afterlife as entry into the kingdom of Osiris.[40] Marvin Mayer notes that some scholars regard the idea of dying and rising deities in the mystery religions as being fanciful but suggests this may be motivated by apologetic concerns, attempting to keep Christ’s resurrection as a unique event. - Wikipedia

Is the story of Jesus simply a retelling of the Osiris Myth?

Christ myth theory proponent G. A. Wells still sees an analogy with the Resurrection of Jesus in the Pauline epistles and Osiris, in that Osiris dies and is mourned on the first day and that his resurrection is celebrated on the third day with the joyful cry “Osiris has been found”.[36] However, since changing his position on the historicity of Jesus, Wells now states that the personage mentioned in the Q source is not all mythical and is “not to be identified with the dying and rising Christ of the early epistles”.[37] David J. MacLeod states that the Osiris legend is very different from the resurrection of Jesus in that “Osiris did not rise; he ruled in the abode of the dead.”[38]

Biblical scholar Bruce M. Metzger does not see a direct analogy and notes that in one account of the Osirian cycle he dies on the 17th of the month of Athyr (approximating to a month between October 28 and November 26 in modern calendars), is revivified on the 19th and compares this to Christ rising on the “third day” but thinks “resurrection” is a questionable description.[39] A. J. M. Wedderburn states that resurrection in Ancient Egypt differs from the Judaeo-Christian tradition, as the Ancient Egyptians conceived of the afterlife as entry into the kingdom of Osiris.[40] Marvin Mayer notes that some scholars regard the idea of dying and rising deities in the mystery religions as being fanciful but suggests this may be motivated by apologetic concerns, attempting to keep Christ’s resurrection as a unique event. - Wikipedia

Is the story of Jesus simply a retelling of the Osiris Myth?
Christ myth theory proponent G. A. Wells still sees an analogy with the Resurrection of Jesus in the Pauline epistles and Osiris, in that Osiris dies and is mourned on the first day and that his resurrection is celebrated on the third day with the joyful cry “Osiris has been found”.[36] However, since changing his position on the historicity of Jesus, Wells now states that the personage mentioned in the Q source is not all mythical and is “not to be identified with the dying and rising Christ of the early epistles”.[37] David J. MacLeod states that the Osiris legend is very different from the resurrection of Jesus in that “Osiris did not rise; he ruled in the abode of the dead.”[38]
Biblical scholar Bruce M. Metzger does not see a direct analogy and notes that in one account of the Osirian cycle he dies on the 17th of the month of Athyr (approximating to a month between October 28 and November 26 in modern calendars), is revivified on the 19th and compares this to Christ rising on the “third day” but thinks “resurrection” is a questionable description.[39] A. J. M. Wedderburn states that resurrection in Ancient Egypt differs from the Judaeo-Christian tradition, as the Ancient Egyptians conceived of the afterlife as entry into the kingdom of Osiris.[40] Marvin Mayer notes that some scholars regard the idea of dying and rising deities in the mystery religions as being fanciful but suggests this may be motivated by apologetic concerns, attempting to keep Christ’s resurrection as a unique event. - Wikipedia

Is the story of Jesus simply a retelling of the Osiris Myth?

Christ myth theory proponent G. A. Wells still sees an analogy with the Resurrection of Jesus in the Pauline epistles and Osiris, in that Osiris dies and is mourned on the first day and that his resurrection is celebrated on the third day with the joyful cry “Osiris has been found”.[36] However, since changing his position on the historicity of Jesus, Wells now states that the personage mentioned in the Q source is not all mythical and is “not to be identified with the dying and rising Christ of the early epistles”.[37] David J. MacLeod states that the Osiris legend is very different from the resurrection of Jesus in that “Osiris did not rise; he ruled in the abode of the dead.”[38]

Biblical scholar Bruce M. Metzger does not see a direct analogy and notes that in one account of the Osirian cycle he dies on the 17th of the month of Athyr (approximating to a month between October 28 and November 26 in modern calendars), is revivified on the 19th and compares this to Christ rising on the “third day” but thinks “resurrection” is a questionable description.[39] A. J. M. Wedderburn states that resurrection in Ancient Egypt differs from the Judaeo-Christian tradition, as the Ancient Egyptians conceived of the afterlife as entry into the kingdom of Osiris.[40] Marvin Mayer notes that some scholars regard the idea of dying and rising deities in the mystery religions as being fanciful but suggests this may be motivated by apologetic concerns, attempting to keep Christ’s resurrection as a unique event. - Wikipedia

NSFW - These Synthetic Sex Dolls Are The Strangest Thing You’ll See Today
U.S. company Synthetics makes “the most beautiful and the highest quality silicone manikins in the world.” Totally NSFW because doll nudity can be incredibly realistic.
- http://www.buzzfeed.com/alanwhite/these-synthetic-sex-dolls-will-haunt-every-last-one-of-your

NSFW - These Synthetic Sex Dolls Are The Strangest Thing You’ll See Today

U.S. company Synthetics makes “the most beautiful and the highest quality silicone manikins in the world.” Totally NSFW because doll nudity can be incredibly realistic.

- http://www.buzzfeed.com/alanwhite/these-synthetic-sex-dolls-will-haunt-every-last-one-of-your

NSFW - These Synthetic Sex Dolls Are The Strangest Thing You’ll See Today
U.S. company Synthetics makes “the most beautiful and the highest quality silicone manikins in the world.” Totally NSFW because doll nudity can be incredibly realistic.
- http://www.buzzfeed.com/alanwhite/these-synthetic-sex-dolls-will-haunt-every-last-one-of-your

NSFW - These Synthetic Sex Dolls Are The Strangest Thing You’ll See Today

U.S. company Synthetics makes “the most beautiful and the highest quality silicone manikins in the world.” Totally NSFW because doll nudity can be incredibly realistic.

- http://www.buzzfeed.com/alanwhite/these-synthetic-sex-dolls-will-haunt-every-last-one-of-your

NSFW - These Synthetic Sex Dolls Are The Strangest Thing You’ll See Today
U.S. company Synthetics makes “the most beautiful and the highest quality silicone manikins in the world.” Totally NSFW because doll nudity can be incredibly realistic.
- http://www.buzzfeed.com/alanwhite/these-synthetic-sex-dolls-will-haunt-every-last-one-of-your

NSFW - These Synthetic Sex Dolls Are The Strangest Thing You’ll See Today

U.S. company Synthetics makes “the most beautiful and the highest quality silicone manikins in the world.” Totally NSFW because doll nudity can be incredibly realistic.

- http://www.buzzfeed.com/alanwhite/these-synthetic-sex-dolls-will-haunt-every-last-one-of-your

NSFW - These Synthetic Sex Dolls Are The Strangest Thing You’ll See Today
U.S. company Synthetics makes “the most beautiful and the highest quality silicone manikins in the world.” Totally NSFW because doll nudity can be incredibly realistic.
- http://www.buzzfeed.com/alanwhite/these-synthetic-sex-dolls-will-haunt-every-last-one-of-your

NSFW - These Synthetic Sex Dolls Are The Strangest Thing You’ll See Today

U.S. company Synthetics makes “the most beautiful and the highest quality silicone manikins in the world.” Totally NSFW because doll nudity can be incredibly realistic.

- http://www.buzzfeed.com/alanwhite/these-synthetic-sex-dolls-will-haunt-every-last-one-of-your

NSFW - These Synthetic Sex Dolls Are The Strangest Thing You’ll See Today
U.S. company Synthetics makes “the most beautiful and the highest quality silicone manikins in the world.” Totally NSFW because doll nudity can be incredibly realistic.
- http://www.buzzfeed.com/alanwhite/these-synthetic-sex-dolls-will-haunt-every-last-one-of-your

NSFW - These Synthetic Sex Dolls Are The Strangest Thing You’ll See Today

U.S. company Synthetics makes “the most beautiful and the highest quality silicone manikins in the world.” Totally NSFW because doll nudity can be incredibly realistic.

- http://www.buzzfeed.com/alanwhite/these-synthetic-sex-dolls-will-haunt-every-last-one-of-your

erevosaether:

EREVOS AETHER  ”M45 Pleiades” collection 

erevosaether:

EREVOS AETHER  ”M45 Pleiades” collection 

Reblogged from erevosaether